Response Times (45_15)

Request

  1. Broken down by month from January- Dec 2013 and Jan-December 2014, how many 999 calls were

 

  1. received
  2. `abandoned’ (not answered on the first time they were patched through from the central operator)

 

  1. Broken down by month from January- Dec 2013 and Jan-Dec 2014, how many non-emergency/101 calls were

 

  1. received
  2. `abandoned’ (not answered on the first time they were patched through from the central operator)

 

  1. How many civilian staff were employed by the force as at 1st Dec 2014, 1st Dec 2013, 1st Dec 2012, 1st Dec 2011 and 1st Dec 2010?

 

 

  1. For each month January- Dec 2013 and Jan= Dec 2014 what was the average response time for police to attend a 999 call out (ie. from logging the call to get to the scene) for calls graded as:
  2. emergency/ Grade 1/A or equivalent
  3. priority/ Grade 2/B or equivalent
  4. non-urgent response/ Grade 3/C

(time in minutes and seconds please)

 

  1. For each month January- Dec 2013 and Jan-Dec 2014 what percentage of 999 emergency call outs were attended within the target time? (Please also supply the target).

 

  1. At 1st Dec 2014, and 1st Dec 2013 how many operational response vehicles were available to the force?

 

Response

  1. Broken down by month from January- Dec 2013 and Jan-December 2014, how many 999 calls were

 

  1. received
  2. `abandoned’ (not answered on the first time they were patched through from the central operator)

 

See attached document and please note that September 2014 has no data as an outage on the telephony systems resulted in the data for the month being deleted, also December 2014 has 4 days of data missing again due to a technical fault.

 

  1. Broken down by month from January- Dec 2013 and Jan-Dec 2014, how many non-emergency/101 calls were

 

  1. received
  2. `abandoned’ (not answered on the first time they were patched through from the central operator)

 

As above, with an additional important note that, when reviewing routine response rates, it must be clear that this grade is a catch all for a variety of incidents that require a resource and also a number of incidents that are created for purely administrative reasons only and will never require a resource, so the % of the total/target is not a realistic figure because the majority of the incidents will automatically fail because a resource is never allocated as it is not necessary.

 

 

  1. How many civilian staff were employed by the force as at 1st Dec 2014, 1st Dec 2013, 1st Dec 2012, 1st Dec 2011 and 1st Dec 2010?

 

Count of Police Staff People and Full Time Equivalent (FTE)

 

2010 = 4,218 People – 3836.5 FTE

2011 = 3,544 People – 3246.1 FTE

2012 = 3,410 People – 3122.2 FTE

2013 = 3,306 People – 3045.6 FTE

2014 = 3,408 People – 3144.6 FTE

 

 

  1. For each month January- Dec 2013 and Jan -Dec 2014 what was the average response time for police to attend a 999 call out (ie. from logging the call to get to the scene) for calls graded as:
  2. emergency/ Grade 1/A or equivalent
  3. priority/ Grade 2/B or equivalent
  4. non-urgent response/ Grade 3/C

(time in minutes and seconds please)

 

As Q1

 

  1. For each month January- Dec 2013 and Jan-Dec 2014 what percentage of 999 emergency call outs were attended within the target time? (Please also supply the target).

 

As above

 

 

  1. At 1st Dec 2014, and 1st Dec 2013 how many operational response vehicles were available to the force?

 

We currently have 158 live response vehicles. It is not possible to provide previous data as our system is a live system that will only give a picture as at the present time.

 

Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from a number of data sources used by forces for police purposes. The detail collected to respond specifically to your request is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when interpreting those data.

 

The figures provided therefore are our best interpretation of relevance of data to your request, but you should be aware that the collation of figures for ad hoc requests may have limitations and this should be taken into account when those data are used.

 

If you decide to write an article / use the enclosed data we would ask you to take into consideration the factors highlighted in this document so as to not mislead members of the public or official bodies, or misrepresent the relevance of the whole or any part of this disclosed material.

Attachments

0001_45_ATTACHMENT_1

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